ISS Leak Localization from Attitude Response

From ANCS Wiki

Revision as of 16:37, 14 November 2012 by Mpw6 (Talk | contribs)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

Iss.jpg

Determining the extent and location of leaks on the International Space Station (ISS) is vital to maintain the operational status and safety of the station. The first indication of a leak on the ISS will likely be a drop in internal pressure. However, the gas leaving the station will likely cause a reaction force. Research is being performed with Dr. Srinivas R. Vadali to develop tools to determine approximate locations and sizes of ISS leaks based on measurements from the attitude determination system. The research has two specific goals:


  • Determine force and torque inputs from ISS attitude measurements
  • Quantify size and location of leaks from the determined forces and torques


The second item may have multiple solutions. Therefore additional information, such as hatch closures, will be incorporated into the overall system tool in order to help reject spurious solutions.


This work was sponsored by United Space Alliance. Results from research can be obtained from:


[1] Kim, J.-W., Crassidis, J.L., Vadali, S.R., and Dershowitz, A.L., “International Space Station Leak Localization Using Attitude Response Data ,” AIAA Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics, Vol. 29, No. 5, Sept.-Oct. 2006, pp. 1041-1050.


[2] Kim, J.-W., Crassidis, J.L., Vadali, S.R., and Dershowitz, A.L., “International Space Station Leak Localization Using Vent Torque Estimation,” 55th International Astronautical Conference, Vancouver, BC, Oct. 2004, IAC-04-A.4.10.


[3] Kim, J.-W., Crassidis, J.L., Vadali, S.R., and Dershowitz, A.L., “International Space Station Leak Localization Using Attitude Disturbance Estimation,” IEEE Aerospace Conference, Big Sky, MT CA, March 2003, IEEEAC Paper #1391.


[4] Kim, J.-W., Crassidis, J.L., Vadali, S.R., and Dershowitz, A.L., “ISS Leak Localization Using Attitude Response,” AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference, Montreal, CA, Aug. 2001, AIAA Paper #01-4272.